Elephant Bitterhead

by Julien Douvier

awfulandonfire:

red delicious remains the worst apple with the most ironic name

i mean, it is red

and that’s all you can say for it.

greenycrimson:

Ponced from Overheard in Waitrose
artmastered:

Mona Hatoum, Grater Divide, 2002, steel, 203.8 x 304.8 cm, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, currently on show at the Royal Academy, London. Source
The humble kitchen grater is enlarged and converted into a massive screen, or divider. The Museum of Fine Arts in Boston states that the concept behind Grater Divide was born out of Hatoum’s experience as an exile from civil war-torn Lebanon. They say that these circumstances ’gave [Hatoum] a distinct perspective on what happens when the familiar changes or disappears.’

artmastered:

Mona Hatoum, Grater Divide, 2002, steel, 203.8 x 304.8 cm, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, currently on show at the Royal Academy, London. Source

The humble kitchen grater is enlarged and converted into a massive screen, or divider. The Museum of Fine Arts in Boston states that the concept behind Grater Divide was born out of Hatoum’s experience as an exile from civil war-torn Lebanon. They say that these circumstances ’gave [Hatoum] a distinct perspective on what happens when the familiar changes or disappears.’

blastedheath:

Elliot Daingerfield (American, 1859–1932), Drama on the mountain top, 1905. Oil on canvas, 30 x 36 in.

blastedheath:

Elliot Daingerfield (American, 1859–1932), Drama on the mountain top, 1905. Oil on canvas, 30 x 36 in.

centuriespast:

Stela of King Ka’a of black quartzite inscribed with the Horus name of the King. This stela is decorated with a serekh (a rectangle with paneled lower half) surmounted by an image of the falcon god Horus. The Horus-name was the oldest element of the pharaoh’s titulary and associated him with the falcon god. The two large pieces of this stela were discovered at Abydos during separate excavations of the Early Dynastic royal cemetery. The fragments were reunited at Penn Museum in 1903.
Egypt, Abydos
Locus: Tomb Q (Tomb of King Ka’a, east side, over chamber 3)
Period: Egyptian Early Dynastic
First Dynasty
Date Made: 3000 - 2800 BC
Penn Museum

centuriespast:

Stela of King Ka’a of black quartzite inscribed with the Horus name of the King. This stela is decorated with a serekh (a rectangle with paneled lower half) surmounted by an image of the falcon god Horus. The Horus-name was the oldest element of the pharaoh’s titulary and associated him with the falcon god. The two large pieces of this stela were discovered at Abydos during separate excavations of the Early Dynastic royal cemetery. The fragments were reunited at Penn Museum in 1903.

Egypt, Abydos

Locus: Tomb Q (Tomb of King Ka’a, east side, over chamber 3)

Period: Egyptian Early Dynastic

First Dynasty

Date Made: 3000 - 2800 BC

Penn Museum

malformalady:

Hand prosthesis, hinged metal on wood

malformalady:

Hand prosthesis, hinged metal on wood

vmagazine:

'Seeking Aether' (experimental garment collection): InAisce FW 13/14 Men's Collection featuring South Sudanese refugee and former child soldier turned actor, model and activist Ger Duany  - video link

emilybridget:

Recoleta cemetery kitty.

emilybridget:

Recoleta cemetery kitty.

paysagemauvais:

Saint Michael, detail - Carlo Crivelli (about 1430/5-about 1494) about 1476tempera and gold on panel91 x 26 cm The National Gallery, London

paysagemauvais:

Saint Michael, detail - Carlo Crivelli (about 1430/5-about 1494) 
about 1476
tempera and gold on panel
91 x 26 cm
The National Gallery, London

allthingseurope:

Puffin Island, Ireland (by zig_rob)

allthingseurope:

Puffin Island, Ireland (by zig_rob)

erikkwakkel:

Candle wax on a medieval page
Medieval evenings were as dark as ours. However, with no electricity and smaller windows, rooms - libraries - will generally have been dark places back then. This is why we frequently encounter candle wax on the pages of medieval books. Looking at such yellow blobs, like the one on this image, it’s not hard to imagine the medieval reader bent over his book, holding a candle. In this case to read a law text and scribble clarifying notes between the lines. A bit of wax to illuminate the law.
Pic (my own): Liverpool University, Sydney Jones Library, MS 4.20 (Italy, 13th century)

erikkwakkel:

Candle wax on a medieval page

Medieval evenings were as dark as ours. However, with no electricity and smaller windows, rooms - libraries - will generally have been dark places back then. This is why we frequently encounter candle wax on the pages of medieval books. Looking at such yellow blobs, like the one on this image, it’s not hard to imagine the medieval reader bent over his book, holding a candle. In this case to read a law text and scribble clarifying notes between the lines. A bit of wax to illuminate the law.

Pic (my own): Liverpool University, Sydney Jones Library, MS 4.20 (Italy, 13th century)

libutron:

Coyamito Agate Pseudomorph | ©Uwe Reier
Rancho Coyamito Norte, Mexico (2013).
Pseudomorphs in agate are quite rare but do occur in nodular agates from various locations, usually as a calcite or aragonite replacement. 

libutron:

Coyamito Agate Pseudomorph©Uwe Reier

Rancho Coyamito Norte, Mexico (2013).

Pseudomorphs in agate are quite rare but do occur in nodular agates from various locations, usually as a calcite or aragonite replacement.